Devices caught by phishing

Attack Overview and Statistics

SANS Institute conducted a survey on how attackers were able to compromise user devices.  They found 74 percent entered via an email attachment or email links, 48 percent from web based drive-by or download, and 30 percent through application vulnerabilities.  Phishing (72 percent), spyware (50 percent), ransomware (49 percent) and Trojans (47 percent) are the threats most seen by respondents.  We continuously monitor the latest attack vectors and scam techniques utilized.  This helps us stop current campaigns and anticipate future vectors.  This blog details how an example social engineering attack occurred.

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Last week researcher Nitay Artenstein of Exodus Intelligence published a proof of concept for a self-replicating worm that could spread autonomously between mobile devices, needing only the device’s WiFi network address to infect the device.

If infected, the device’s WiFi chip would be completely under the attacker’s control, allowing them to propagate the malware to other devices on the network. They might also use this foothold to attempt to exploit another vulnerability and gain full access to the device’s main OS and data.

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Malware as a service is exploding in popularity, this allows it to be distributed openly as a service by the creators. “Customers” pay a fee for the usage of the Trojan just as businesses would for cloud provided services.  This essentially allows anyone to purchase the Adwind Remote Access Trojan (RAT) for a small fee, regardless of computer skill.  Recent examples we’ve blocked utilize .jar (java archive) files or .jar files inside .zip files.

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Congratulations go out to AppRiver Senior SharePoint Escalation Lead David Petree, who was selected as a 2017 Microsoft MVP Award-winner.

It is no small feat to be named a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Award winner. It is even more exceptional when you are named an MVP four years in a row. Not to mention being only one of nearly 1,500 technical experts worldwide to receive the honor.

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Cybercriminals are nothing if not persistent. Part of that persistence comes in the form of reoccurring themes.

One of the most popular social engineering themes utilized in malware distribution over the past decade have come in the form of phony emails posing as a parcel delivery notifications. Think UPS, FEDEX, DHL or USPS etc…

The attackers tend to stick to what works. After all, why stray from the formula so long as some people are willing to click?

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